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Question? Do Rainbows do outdoor adventure?

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#1
Was looking at another youth group's pages, at some of the activities their group's 6-7 year olds have done recently. The list included: Canoeing, Kayaking, Rowing, Sailing, caving, climbing/abseiling, archery, knife work, firelighting, 10 mile hike, Shooting, cooked outside, fire lighting, played conkers, orienteering.

Wondered whether many Rainbow units have done similar activities recently, or do so regularly?
 

Lynz

Veteran (100+ posts)
#2
Canoeing/ Kayaking/ Rowing/ Sailing are all 7+ and Shooting is 10+ as per the manual, so not feasible for most rainbow groups to offer. I'm not personally a rainbow leader but I know of units who have done caving, orienteering and cooking on fires and I have taught rainbows archery at various mixed-section events.
 

MummySquirrel

Veteran (100+ posts)
#3
We've done cooking outdoors, only sausages but girls enjoyed it. But outdoor adventure doesn't necessarily have to be kayaking, climbing etc especially for Rainbows. We've taken ours den building in the woods with toasting marshmallows on a disposable barbecue, wide game in a large, local park, nature trail at a nature reserve, street trail in the dark - every one equally exciting to the Rainbows because they're things they've never done before.
 

Cathy

Veteran (100+ posts)
#4
We have done climbing/abseiling, nature walk (1 mile, not 10!), geocaching, tobogganing and firelighting (with other backwoods activities) in the last 12 months. It does frustrate me a bit that almost all watersports are 7+, I would love to take the rainbows canoeing or kayaking and am sure it could be done in a safe and age appropriate manner.
 

Fox

Brownie-induced madness
#5
Ten miles!
We've done, not all with the same girls, climbing (my 4yo son joined in) & abseiling (and the Guide site lets 5 year olds do climbing which the local climbing wall doesn't), shorter walks, toasting marshmallows over a fire, archery. There's an orienteering course we could use locally, I'd do that but haven't, and we've also done geocaching.
I *think* I've done lighting candles - I certainly would - therefore I'd do firelighting too.
 

canielle

Veteran (100+ posts)
#6
We’ve let our rainbows cook sausages and s’mores on a fire as well as taking them to the local wood and had them den building, doing a pirate themed treasure hunt and Girlguiding Scotland’s forest challenge and Out and About badges
 
#7
We’ve let our rainbows cook sausages and s’mores on a fire as well as taking them to the local wood and had them den building, doing a pirate themed treasure hunt and Girlguiding Scotland’s forest challenge and Out and About badges
Sorry to edge in on this thread but I was wondering if you needed an added qualification on top of being a leader to be able to take rainbows out locally? And what the adult/child ratio would be?
 

Quack

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#8
Generally, no you don't need any additional qualifications for events out of the meeting place subject to the activity that you are doing. Some activities will need additional qualifications such as climbing or water sports, but a trip to the park should be fine.

Before any event out of the meeting place you need to check the Guiding website for ratio's and any other considerations, inform your District Commissioner and consider whether you need additional permission forms from the parents ie if you are meeting somewhere different to your usual meeting place or if timings are different, you should also do a risk assessment and make sure all your team are aware of the contents. If in doubt ask your Commissioner.

Adult to child ratios
 

Burghilly

Veteran (100+ posts)
#9
At the risk of sounding like a kill-joy, wouldn't it be better to save these sort of activities untill girls were at least mid-Brownie age?

If you do caving, shooting and massive hikes when you're 6 what will you have left to do when you 8,9,10 etc..?

I can see some people would say ' The younger the better' and for perhaps a few children it may well spark a life long interest in a particular activity , but for most it would just blurr into the mad, busy world of a 6 year old.

I am 100% for getting kids outdoors but for me I think children probably need to be about 8 to get something meaningful out of a shooting session or a kayaking experience.
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#10
At the risk of sounding like a kill-joy, wouldn't it be better to save these sort of activities untill girls were at least mid-Brownie age?

If you do caving, shooting and massive hikes when you're 6 what will you have left to do when you 8,9,10 etc..?

I can see some people would say ' The younger the better' and for perhaps a few children it may well spark a life long interest in a particular activity , but for most it would just blurr into the mad, busy world of a 6 year old.

I am 100% for getting kids outdoors but for me I think children probably need to be about 8 to get something meaningful out of a shooting session or a kayaking experience.
No, we have found the opposite. Early experience of adventure broadens girls' horizons and encourages them to realise their capabilities. 8 or older is too late - by that time they've experienced enough stereotyping to have their self-belief narrowed. Experiencing adventure early does not lead to 'done it all before', it leads to 'I can'.
 

badgemad4

Veteran (100+ posts)
#11
In my experience starting outdoor skills younger can be great for establishing the basics. Meaning that by the time they can do things “properly” you can spend time with them doing more advanced or interesting things, think being able to let Guides create their own route and walk on their own for a bit vs having to explain what a compass is, or being able to go straight into backwoods cooking rather than having them all scared of matches.
 

Epona

Veteran (100+ posts)
#12
Start them young, but bear in mind that the simplest things can be adventurous if they've never done them before.

So things like going on a nature hike, collecting wood and helping to make a campfire, cooking something on a campfire, putting up a tent, learning the basic points of a compass, handling a blade safely (either for whittling OR chopping food), bouldering are all good starter activities. Paddlesports certainly depends on your location and budget.

As a Brownie and Guide leader it's nice to have ex-Rainbows who know the basics.
 

Abby

Regular (50+ posts)
#13
We've done archery with Rainbows, and climbing - albeit on an inside wall, and it was 'Climbing games' so they only use the low levels and don't have to be harnessed.
We've done s'mores over a tealight candle - takes some patience but does work! We've cooked on a disposable BBQ, but don't tend to often just because it needs more supervision than we have adults available.
Agree that you need to keep some of the more adventurous activities for when they are a bit older, but it's always good to give them a small taste of what is to come so that they can build up their interest!