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Question? Non-plastic poppies

Epona

Veteran (100+ posts)
#1
We do a fair bit of poppy craft in our units before Remembrance, but we also buy wreaths and lapel poppies to support the RBL. We have become increasingly concerned at the small bits of plastic in the poppies which are discarded in large numbers about now. I thought that there might be support for an all-paper/card poppy which biodegrades without harm. I've written to the RBL but I'm just one voice. Is this something that other people might like to see too?
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#2
We do a fair bit of poppy craft in our units before Remembrance, but we also buy wreaths and lapel poppies to support the RBL. We have become increasingly concerned at the small bits of plastic in the poppies which are discarded in large numbers about now. I thought that there might be support for an all-paper/card poppy which biodegrades without harm. I've written to the RBL but I'm just one voice. Is this something that other people might like to see too?
As the poppies (in Scotland at least) are made in a factory staffed by veterans, which gives supported work to veterans who would struggle to work elsewhere, and using machines and techniques which are years old - to change the construction and materials of the poppies may involve a lot of expense to the charities (using funds raised for the cause) and may have impact on the veterans employed. So though it may be possible, there would be a number of considerations in order to limit detriment.
 

Quack

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#3
Fenris is right, there are cost considerations to the RBL but I've noticed, this year even more so that people are opting for more longstanding poppies. The metal sparkly ones, reflector ones for children and my own favourite, the smaller pin badge version. I wonder if these are part of the way to reduce the plastic used in general by reducing the demand for the 'disposable' variety. The other side is that can the plastic aspects be recycled in the household waste collections?
 

Epona

Veteran (100+ posts)
#4
Yes, I think there is scope for more choice which the RBL could explore. I'm not saying dispose of the old machines all at once, but as part of a growing trend, they could look at cardboard.
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#5
Fenris is right, there are cost considerations to the RBL but I've noticed, this year even more so that people are opting for more longstanding poppies. The metal sparkly ones, reflector ones for children and my own favourite, the smaller pin badge version. I wonder if these are part of the way to reduce the plastic used in general by reducing the demand for the 'disposable' variety. The other side is that can the plastic aspects be recycled in the household waste collections?
The plastic can be recycled in certain supermarkets, where poppies are collected.
 

Pixielation

Brown Owl (x2)
#6
Sainsburys had stick on poppies. They had no plastic in them at all, from what I could see. It's a shame not all places offered these obviously - or perhaps they sold out first.
 

Quack

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#7
Just seen online that Sainsburys are accepting poppies back for recycling. The plastic bits will be used again and the paper recycled.
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#8
Also worth bearing in mind that poppies in Scotland are supplied by a different charity (as well as being of a different design, with no leaf).