• Welcome Guest to the new look forum. For more information refer to this thread

Best place to take camp module

perdita96

Beginner (10+ posts)
#1
Morning!
Where would everyone recommend for taking a bunch of Brownies to do my camp module?
I notice some sites have access to kitchen facilities - would this count on your camp module???
Thanks :)
 

Quack

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#2
I'm going to be a little controversial now...are you looking for an 'easy pass', looking to demonstrate that you can camp or are you looking to give your girls a great outdoor experience. All three may come into being, but I think before you take girls away under canvas you need to be able to cope with all that camping and British weather can throw at you. Once you have the module you could, theoretically, camp anywhere that Guiding will allow.

So whilst I don't suggest that you go out of your way to make life difficult for yourself, I think you need to consider what sort of camping will you be doing, eg activity camps or simply sleeping in tents but doing most stuff indoors etc..What equipment do you have, what are the skills of your leadership team etc...no good camping and cooking outdoors if your QM hasn't the faintest about cooking on a fire or a camp stove...

Do you have a local site that you are familiar with or that you can visit or camp with someone else...Camping is a bigger jump than some people recognise and gaining experience and skills from others is invaluable. Speak to your local advisors and trust their judgment.
 

perdita96

Beginner (10+ posts)
#3
Quack - don't get me wrong, I am not looking for an easy way out, but I am also not looking to make my life unduly difficult!
We have never been camping as a unit before and so have no equipment at all! We can borrow tents and most girls have sleeping equipment (from indoor holidays with the unit and family camping). As I camp with my family I understand the basics of what will be needed, but don't want to spend a lot of unit money on equipment that we may never use again - if you understand where I am coming from?
I would prefer the girls were outside as much as possible (we do a lot indoors at our meetings as it is), and am thinking a site which would offer some outdoor activity options, but need a back up in case of torrential rain. The leaders involved are comfy with outdoor cooking so I am not too worried by that.
I am more wondering if I will get shot down in flames if I use the on site fridge / freezer, or incase dinner can't be cooked on an open fire use of an onsite oven. Not many of our units in the district camp & I don't know any one else who is camping so far.
I would love to do my camp module and am aware that it will take a lot of planning hence (probably the start of) all the daft questions.
Thank you.
 

mad guider and mum

Beginner (10+ posts)
#4
I was assessed for my camping module a few years back. Admitely I took guides, On the weekend, but I run a brownie unit as well. We stayed at cherry green trees.
Had shared use of a fridge/freezer/ microwave/ oven and electricity if needed. Each site has a shelter that at a squash could all stand/sit in if had too.
Saying that the girls cooked/ate outside/ heated water on gas/ over a fire.( though it was nice just to put a kettle on at 6am for a cup of tea!
,We provided our own challenges. Camping and cooking takes up most of the day. We took a Colman shelter.
I would get in touch with the camp advisor for all your area and ask what they are looking for.
Also if you read the additional camping module in the' going away" book, it will explain what you need to cover and prove competence of. I'm presuming you have modules 1-7 already?
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#5
If you don't have camping equipment, then the first thing to look for is an 'equipped' site. These will supply you with tents, fireplaces, and all the pots and utensils you will need. They may also supply stoves. What sort of tents are supplied will vary from location to location - in my area all the equipped sites supply Icelandic tents.

Nowadays most sites will have a toilet block containing flushing toilets and sinks with hot/cold water, some will also have showers. Often there will be access to a fridge to store food, and/or they will be able to freeze the blocks for your coolbox. There would not normally be a domestic cooker. There aren't any rules on what type of cooking facilities you use at camp, only that those you use are safe, appropriate, hygienic, and that the girls are involved in the cooking.

Since it's Brownies, there has to be a solid building or hut which you could retreat to if the weather is too foul - this has to be of an appropriate size for the number of girls you are planning to take.
 

OrangeOwl

Veteran (100+ posts)
#6
Since it's Brownies, there has to be a solid building or hut which you could retreat to if the weather is too foul - this has to be of an appropriate size for the number of girls you are planning to take.
..or be close enough to home that girls can be collected if necessary. The rules re solid shelter and adult ratios changed a bit in BBB year to encourage more of us out of doors.

I've camped a couple of times now with our Brownies and the advisor asked why we did this or that as it wasn't what Guides usually did, but we had made our plans based on the younger age group and knowing that we wanted a clear difference in experience between Brownies and Guides, so a more relaxed lightweight tents, fridge and running water approach has worked well for us. Camp module is about considering the outdoor life (weather) and looking after camp and canvas: you can do that whether you have a hut and loos or a marquee and lat pit.
 

OrangeOwl

Veteran (100+ posts)
#7
Whereabouts in midlands are you? We've always been happy with Brownies at the Northants campsite at Castle Ashby: small but perfectly formed for Brownies.
 

partygirl

Veteran (100+ posts)
#8
I would never go away camping without a building now. It doesn't mean you are not doing it "properly". Lots of sites have camping with a hut alongside that you can hire - many with cooking facilities. We always cook on wood fires but have the provided cooking facilities in case we need them and having somewhere for everyone to be together in a storm is invaluable. An assessor would hopefully look at that as you are thinking ahead and preparing for all eventualities.
If you are in East Midlands there are quite a few with huts/buildings that you can hire to go with camping. Downing at Elton (Girlguiding Nottinghamshire) is my Guides favourite but we would also recommend The Oaks at Charnwood (Scout site with activities - Leicestershire), Topstones (Girlguiding Leicestershire) and Glenbrook (Girlguiding Derbyshire)
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#9
Since it's Brownies, there has to be a solid building or hut which you could retreat to if the weather is too foul - this has to be of an appropriate size for the number of girls you are planning to take.
..or be close enough to home that girls can be collected if necessary. The rules re solid shelter and adult ratios changed a bit in BBB year to encourage more of us out of doors.

I've camped a couple of times now with our Brownies and the advisor asked why we did this or that as it wasn't what Guides usually did, but we had made our plans based on the younger age group and knowing that we wanted a clear difference in experience between Brownies and Guides, so a more relaxed lightweight tents, fridge and running water approach has worked well for us. Camp module is about considering the outdoor life (weather) and looking after camp and canvas: you can do that whether you have a hut and loos or a marquee and lat pit.
As a last resort, but then 'abandon camp' is an option for all sections but not one you would ever use by choice. There are few sites nowadays which don't have some type of equipment hut, shed or similar building which could be used for your dry shelter if need be.
 

OrangeOwl

Veteran (100+ posts)
#10
I agree Fenris: but I think the rule about solid shelters made it much more difficult to camp with brownies as it limited the number of sites, so it's a good thing that we don't need them, even if they are often available. We're camping this weekend and if we had to find a venue with indoor space for 36 girls to sleep just in case we would never go. As it is there is no way we'd abandon camp except in the most extreme circumstances, but because we are within an hour of home we can still camp even though the hut wouldn't hold 36 girls.