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Health Form question

CrystalQueen

Beginner (10+ posts)
#1
I had a bit of a difference of opinion with the other Guider in my unit. We don't have a county first aid advisor at the moment.
What do you have to list on the medication space on the Health form? Absolutely everything in the first aid box, or just the actual medications? Up until now we have been attaching a list with everything on it to the back of the health form. Is this necessary?
 

Tregi

Veteran (100+ posts)
#4
Anything you take that you might use, that people could be allergic to/preferences off. Plasters, creams, medication like paracetamol
 

Sunny2nd

Guide and Ranger Leader
GuiderPlus
#5
If I have a parents meeting then I normally show them the first aid box - indicate the sort of thing that won't be specifically listed like bandages, dressings, small bottle of vinegar for wasp stings and baking soda for bee stings, etc. I normally tell them that we often use non-branded items to keep costs down. All the "medicines" and plaster types go on the list. We've cut down on the number of medicines and make it very basic - Paracetamol (for things like headaches), Ibuprofen tablets/creams (for aches and pains), Dioralyte (for if girls have upset tums leading to diarrhea), simple linctus and/or throat sweets for coughs and standard waterproof & hypoallergenic plasters. If the parents want to provide anything else then they can - clearly labelled. The price of medicines is so large now and its wasteful if they don't get used.
 

browniebeth

Brownie Leader
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#6
Sunny, you say you've cut back, but the only things we take on brownie holiday are calpol sachets, paracetamol (for adults), and possibly strepsils. Frankly, if they need meds because of diarrhoea, coughing up their guts or being sick etc, they need to go home!

We list all those, but we would include plasters - even though it's not a medication, it's amazing how many parents say their DD is allergic.

Suncream is another one that causes allergies to come crawling out, so we list it. However, we say parents must provide their preferred brand, and at the parents meeting we make it clear that if they come without, we will use our own to ensure they don't burn, unless they tell us otherwise (in which case, we'd have to ring home in the event of sunshine.....not had cause to do so yet!)

As you say, meds are expensive to buy on the off-chance that they might be used. That's why we buy calpol in sachet form, because it generally lasts longer than a bottle you've had 2 spoons out of and shoved to the back of the cupboard!
 

sandra 100

Veteran (100+ posts)
#7
we were told on a first aid training that if the girls are ill enough to need medication then they should be sent home
we always ask girls to bring their own suncream (With their name on )
 

Lynz

Veteran (100+ posts)
#8
What is sensible depends on where you're going and what you're doing - for a sleepover in the local church hall with parents and a late night chemist 5 minutes away you probably don't need any medication and certainly don't need to spend lots covering all possibilities, whereas if you're on a residential trip hours away or even abroad and eating unusual things or doing strenuous activities then it would be sensible to have at least some of the basics like calpol/ paracetamol/ ibuprofen/ antihistamine/ cough sweets/ dioralite etc on hand just in case.
 

Quack

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#9
I would tend to list the 'medications' so paracetamol, anti-histamine cream and maybe antiseptic or a cough syrup. I do Guides so I would expect to treat things like period pain, maybe bites or stings, perhaps a cough.

It is horses for courses so a local winter weekend indoors I would add the cough syrup (branded) and summer I'd go more for antihistamine, but the fundamentals are I would ask permission for any oral or topical treatments that are not 'first aid' but more healthcare for girls to feel better. We are not medical professionals nor should we try to be, but we all know that sometimes a little common sense and a placebo effect can be effective in girls being able to continue a residential rather than becoming a distraction or making a bad situation worse. If the common sense says professional treatment or care at home, then that's what we do.
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#10
we were told on a first aid training that if the girls are ill enough to need medication then they should be sent home
we always ask girls to bring their own suncream (With their name on )
That depends on how feasible it is, and how serious the condition is. A slight headache may be relieved by a single painkiller tablet, a cold may be eased by a suitable cough or sore throat medication, such that the girl would be fit to enjoy the holiday and play a full part in it - and if you are a long way from home or abroad, sending home may not be a straightforward thing to do . . .
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#11
I list the main internal medications (painkiller, cough mixture etc). We then attach a list of the full first aid box contents. Personally, I'm allergic to Elastoplast in almost all it's forms (so including plasters, tape, most dressings with adhesive tape, etc).
 

chopperchick

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#12
I would list just "medication" e.g. cough syrup, paracetemol. The point of noting it was / is that parents are giving you consent to administer that brand / type of cough syrup in accordance with the manufacturer's guidelines for that specific medication. The nuance of that point is that the parent gets the opportunity to withhold that consent if they don't wish their child to receive Calpol or paracetemol or antihistamines or whatever.

As a first aid trainer, I was always encouraged to make a distinction between "first aid" and "looking after" even though both concepts are delivered in the one Girlguiding course. Admittedly, when we go on a residential, it's easy to become blurred. But "first aid kits" and "provision of first aid" are both fairly clearly defined concepts. As leaders, we provide "first aid" in a similar way as I provide first aid at work to my colleagues and customers, or to a fellow motorist if I came across a car accident. Separately, we have a responsibility to "look after" children in our care, "in loco parentis" effectively. Particularly when we go away on residential trips, our idea of "looking after" these children may well extend to providing low level medication (e.g. cough syrup). But the two should be very separate concepts. Simplistically, a "first aid kit" should be available for everyone (notwithstanding as the FA you'd want to know that everyone taking a plaster didn't have a really deep cut etc etc) - whereas "medication" should be looked away / under stricter control.

Known allergies should obviously be recorded on the participant's health form.

"Needing medication, should go home" is reasonable, to a point. Obviously, you need to assess where home / doctor / A&E is compared to residential location, to decide that one.
 
#13
Slightly off subject, for those that take Calpol, have they noticed girls asking for it at bedtime despite having nothing wrong with them but because 'mum' gives it to them? Had this on the last pack holiday I was on and it seems after asking around some mums are using Calpol as a 'sleeping aid' for children. They didn't get any from me though, not for sleeping at any rate.
I did have one girl with us who had serious medical issues and a lot of drugs ( every couple of hours) to take but bless her she breezes though life taking it all in her stride and was a real pleasure to have with us so don't be put off by a girl having medical issues.
 

catdrew

Brownie Guider
GuiderPlus
#14
we have had girls who cant have calpol before so it is best to list the actual make of medicine you have got ie if morrisons own say that rather than calpol.

i think ours was anything that would need to be locked up was listed and we just said we had usual plasters, bandages and stuff but if any allergies bring their own. if they want a particular make for child again bring their own.

i wouldnt list the whole kit.
 

CrystalQueen

Beginner (10+ posts)
#16
Thanks for all your replies. I was really hoping that someone would say something like "on page xxx of the GAW book it say yyy" which I haven't been able to find for myself in either the manual, the Going Away book or the Health Matters book. My judgement would be that only medication should be listed but the GIC at my unit is adamant that everything needs to be consented to.
 

Lynz

Veteran (100+ posts)
#18
We'd normally include on the health form anything above and beyond "basic first aid", i.e. the stuff we wouldn't have in the first aid kit for normal meetings, so mainly any medications or lotions. The heading on the health form is very specifically "Medication" and there's room further down the form for parents to fill in any allergies to things like plasters.
 

Lynz

Veteran (100+ posts)
#19
Although it would be worth having a complete list of box contents available at the parents meeting in case a parent wants to check anything!