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PL training tips

Burghilly

Veteran (100+ posts)
#1
I'm planning to run my first patrol leader training session in the next few weeks but not really sure how to approach it. We have 3 PL's at the moment and want to hold a session specific to them.

How can I make the session fun and interactive? I don't want it to be a 'lesson' with me doing all the talking.
 

Quack

Veteran (100+ posts)
Staff member
GuiderPlus
Moderator
#2
Have you seen the Beginning to lead resource on the Guide website ? It's aimed at pack leaders and young leaders but some good tips in it...
 

fenris

fenris
GuiderPlus
#3
We tend to utilise the 'Team Leader' interest badge, but in addition focus on a specific skill the PLs have asked for.

So last time we discussed how to choose and plan a game for the unit - as that was something they could use with their Patrols, but those who are Brownie Helpers would find it useful. So we chatted over what part of the meeting - at the start to burn off fidgets before settling down to work, or at the end when the night was getting late and people would be tiring? Whether there was a purpose - was it a game to work on a particular skill (e.g. good turns, or listening, or to practice something they had just learned the theory of like lifeline throwing or sling bandaging)?

We then challenged them to pick a game we played regularly, and take turns at explaining the rules to the others and us. They soon learned that they needed to be enthusiastic, they needed to keep their instructions brief and clear, and they needed to get people's attention before explaining. And - they had to have a clear idea of what they wanted otherwise the setting up took ages.

We then played the game they had chosen, and then asked them afterwards to look at how it went. Had everyone understood the instructions, or were people making mistakes, or did the game have to be stopped while further explanation was given? If there was scoring or judging being done, was it clear and fair? Were people making mistakes/doing things which might have been unfair spotted, and was it dealt with or overlooked? Did the game achieve it's aim?
 

Burghilly

Veteran (100+ posts)
#4
We then challenged them to pick a game we played regularly, and take turns at explaining the rules to the others and us.
I like the sound of this - something they can actually try and see how it feels and even if it does go a bit wrong has potential for the mistakes to be funny.